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Fr.om. januari 2020 publicerar SITES nyheter enbart på engelska

Thermometer located on a building at Tarfala Research Station shows 30 deg C on July 3 at 2pm. Photo: Nina Kirchner Thermometer located on a building at Tarfala Research Station shows 30 deg C on July 3 at 2pm. Photo: Nina Kirchner

The summer 2021 is facing a heat wave across the northern hemisphere with temperatures rising to more than 10°C above the long-term average in some regions of Scandinavia.

International media has been covering this topic with focus on the extreme high pressure system over parts of Canada, but Finland, Norway and Sweden are also of special interest for meteorologist as The Guardian reported last week. 

SITES maintains long-term meteorological stations that allow for temperature trends to be monitored across several regions in Sweden. In northern Sweden daily air temperature data from Tarfala Research Station and Abisko Scientific Research Station show that in early June of this year temperatures were higher than the average June temperature of previous years (see graphs below). This data is openly available on the SITES Data Portal for use by the research community and those interested in analysing long-term temperature trends.

Check out the most recent meteorological data updates from SITES stations at Tarfala Research Station and Abisko Scientific Research Station.
 

June daily temperature at Tarfala (left) and Abisko (right) in 2021 compared to the average temperature of previous years. Data is openly available on the SITES Data Portal. June daily temperature at Tarfala (left) and Abisko (right) in 2021 compared to the average temperature of previous years. Data is openly available on the SITES Data Portal.
One of the 150 nest boxes checked for reproductive success of starling. Photo: Gunnar Jansson. One of the 150 nest boxes checked for reproductive success of starling. Photo: Gunnar Jansson.
Reproduction is the focus of much of the wildlife monitoring in spring and early summer at Grimsö Wildlife Research Station. Two of the species monitored are starlings and red fox.

Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) reproduction has been monitored annually at Grimsö since 1981. The survey is part of a national system which was initially started to detect potential effects of pesticides used in agriculture at the time. At Grimsö, 150 nest boxes, distributed in six separate areas, are checked several times during the reproductive season and the dates of egg laying, fledging etc. are noted. A slight but significant decrease in starling numbers, but not nesting success, has been observed over time. The factors behind the decrease is unclear, but it is at least partly thought to be related to a reduced use of grazing cattle.

Red fox (Vulpes vulpes) reproduction has been monitored in Grimsö wildlife research area since 1973. In this survey, ca. 190 dens are checked annually for signs of red fox and badger (Meles meles) reproduction. The local fox abundance, which may vary a lot between years, is an important factor and a classic topic in wildlife ecology since fox densities may strongly influence population fluctuations of many small game species like hares and grouse. The fox reproduction in turn, is strongly related to the seasonal abundance of voles which are an important food resource for foxes.
One of the dens checked for signs of reproduction of fox and badger. A trained dog could be very useful in this work when it comes to separate ongoing versus earlier use of a den. Photo: Gunnar Jansson.


Text: Gunnar Jansson.

SITES Community at the 2017 All Hands Meeting. Photo: Helene Hagerman.
SITES Community at the 2017 All Hands Meeting. Photo: Helene Hagerman.

Mark your calendar for 29 Nov – 1 Dec 2021 as we hope the SITES All Hands Meeting can take place in person at Sigtunahöjden!  

The meeting planning has begun and in the coming months, the SITES Secretariat, along with a meeting committee made up of SITES community members, will develop and plan the meeting agenda and activities.

Detailed information about the meeting will be sent out closer to the meeting date.  
We look forward to bringing the SITES community together for this event and really hope things continue to progress so we can meet in person!    

Sampling GHG chambers at Stortjärn (Svartberget). Photo: Andreas Palmén Sampling GHG chambers at Stortjärn (Svartberget). Photo: Andreas Palmén
As part of the SITES Water monitoring program, floating chambers are used to determine greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) from lakes. The GHG program is conducted at five stations (Abisko, Asa, Erken, Skogaryd and Svartberget) and runs throughout the open water season. The sampling strategy, three transects each with four chambers spread across a depth interval, is based on the lake depth structure and is individual for the different stations. Since the lakes are spread across different climate gradients, the open water season varies, with lakes located in southern Sweden able to start the program earlier in the year.   
Chamber placed on Erssjön (Skogaryd)  Photo: Siva Natchimuthu
Chamber placed on Erssjön (Skogaryd) Photo: Siva Natchimuthu

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