Research on vegetation along Mt. Nuolja are relaunched with citicens science

One hundred years ago, Swedish botanist Thore C. E. Fries conducted a study of snowmelt dates and plant phenology in the relatively new Abisko National Park (established 1909). His study took place along a transect from the bottom to the summit of Mt. Nuolja. As he hiked up and down the mountain some 150 times during the three years of the study, he probably could not imagine how important his study would be a hundred years later.

The mountain Nuolja in winter. Note that the tree line has shifted upwards. Photo Credit: black-and-white  C. G. Alm 28 February 1921 and the colour photo Oliver Wright 28 February 2017 (copyright Oliver Wright 2017). Photp from Umeå Univsersity press release.
The mountain Nuolja in winter. Note that the tree line has shifted upwards. Photo Credit: black-and-white C. G. Alm 28 February 1921 and the colour photo Oliver Wright 28 February 2017 (copyright Oliver Wright 2017). Photp from Umeå Univsersity press release.

CIRC researchers, in collaboration with the Abisko Scientific Research Station, Swedish Phenology Network, and Naturum Abisko, will re-establish the transect in 2017 and replicate the study over the next three years.

Aided by a new smart phone app being developed by the Swedish Phenology Network, the public will be able to hike the transect and collect data. Along the way, they will be presented with the knowledge and tools to understand how we conduct our research and be able to compare the results immediately with the original study in 1917–1919 tells Keith Larson.

Interested in doing science a favour?
Interested members of the public are encouraged to contact researchers at AbiskoCitizenScience@gmail.com

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